Limited Edition Wood Bases : 23cm Albion

The sleek profile of the Albion allows us to turn a large variety of woods. A few new bases we are currently working on……….

5,300 Year Old Bog Oak

Also known as abonos and morta, Bog-wood is a material from trees that have been buried in peat bogs and preserved from decay by the acidic and anaerobic bog conditions, sometimes for hundreds or even thousands of years. The wood is usually stained brown by tannins dissolved in the acidic water. Bog-wood represents the early stages in the fossilisation of wood, with further stages ultimately forming jet, lignite and coal over a period of many millions of years. Bog-wood may come from any tree species naturally growing near or in bogs, including oak (Quercus – “bog oak”), pine, yew, swamp cypress and kauri. Bog-wood is often removed from fields and placed in clearance cairns. It is a rare form of timber that is claimed to be “comparable to some of the world’s most expensive tropical hardwoods”.

 

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BoxWood

Owing to its fine grain it is a good wood for fine wood carving. Formerly, it was used for wooden combs.

Owing to the relatively high density of the wood (it is one of the few woods that are denser than water), boxwood is often used for chess pieces, unstained boxwood for the white pieces and stained (‘ebonised’) boxwood for the black pieces, in lieu of ebony.

High quality wooden spoons have usually been carved from box.

Boxwood was once called dudgeon, and was used for the handles of dirks, and daggers, with the result that such a knife was known as a dudgeon. Although one “in high dudgeon” is indignant and enraged, and while the image of a dagger held high, ready to plunge into an enemy, has a certain appeal, lexicographers have no real evidence as to the origin of the phrase.

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Purpleheart

Purpleheart is an extremely dense and water-resistant wood. It is ranked one of the hardest and stiffest of the woods in the world. It is so durable that it can be used in applications that require toughness, such as truck decking. The trees are prized for their beautiful heartwood which, when cut, quickly turns from a light brown to a rich purple colour. Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light darkens the wood to a brown colour with a slight hue of the original purple. The longer the wood is exposed to UV lights (e.g. sunlight), the colour of purple slowly changes from a light purple to a substantially chocolate-purple colour. This effect can be minimised with a finish containing a UV inhibitor. The wood is also known as amaranth and violet wood.

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Wenge

A tropical timber, very dark in colour with a distinctive figure and a strong partridge wood pattern. The wood is heavy and hard, suitable for flooring and staircases.

Several musical instrument makers employ wenge in their products – guitars and drums.

The wood is sometimes used in the making of archery bows, particularly as a laminate in the production of flatbows. It can also be used in the making of rails or pin blocks on hammered dulcimers.

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Zebrano

The wood of Microberlinia (also known as Zebrano) is imported from central Africa, (Gabon, Cameroon, and Congo). The heartwood is a pale golden yellow, distinct from the very pale color of the sapwood and features narrow streaks of dark brown to black. Zebrawood can also be a pale brown with regular or irregular marks of dark brown in varying widths. It is almost always quartersawn to get the exciting alternating color pattern.

It is a heavy, hard wood with a somewhat coarse texture, often with an interlocked or wavy grain. The interlocked grain of this wood, like that of many tropical woods, can make it difficult to work.

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Bubinga

The deep brick red colour and high density of bubinga give it an undeniable visual and physical presence — this wood has authority.

Bubinga’s rich reddish tones are laced with darker annual ring lines that can produce striking flatsawn surfaces. The grain is straight to interlocked. It has a uniform fine to medium texture and moderate natural luster.

An immensely popular imported African hardwood, Bubinga may be loved as much for its quirky name as it is for its strength and beauty. Also sometimes called Kevazingo, usually in reference to its decorative rotary-cut veneer.

Bubinga has a close resemblance to rosewood, and is often use in place of it. Yet Bubinga also features a host of stunning grain figures, such as flamed, pommele, and waterfall, which make this wood truly unique. Bubinga also has an exceptional strength-to-weight ratio.

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Enquiries : jade@bellerbyandco.com

Bellerby & Co Globemakers

Bellerby & Co Globemakers; Creators of high quality, beautiful handmade world globes. Combining traditional techniques with pioneering design. Handcrafted terrestrial and celestial globes in London. We create models of many sizes and styles, and offer a bespoke service.

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